IDI is a non-profit organisation dedicated to enhancing Islay's economy, prosperity and way of life as part of the Inner Hebrides.

Tel. 01496 810880

info@islaydevelopment.com

Unit 11 Whin Park, Bridgend, Isle of Islay PA44 7NZ, UK

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WHAT WE'RE DOING

Learn about IDI's exciting initiatives, both those that are live now and in development.

Islay's beaches face a constant flow of marine litter, damaging wildlife, our island's appeal to visitors and its prosperity.

Every year, Islay sends 60 tonnes of waste wood to the mainland for processing and incineration. This valuable commodity is lost to the community. The carbon footprint for transport and disposal is also substantial.

Our pollinators face a constant, increasing threat due to loss of habitat and exposure to chemicals, pests and diseases. Many species face extinction.

Islay suffers from a lack of available land for community development, including housing, and has no ‘circular’ solution for its forestry – in other words, one that makes full use of locally-grown resources.

Islay was in danger of losing three vital Post Office outlets. The island also has little available retail space – in fact, anywhere to sell local crafts and products.

Islay annually produces 60 tonnes of furniture for possible re-use or upcycling.

Islay’s distilleries annually produce 500 tonnes of waste – everything from cardboard to office furniture.

IN PLANNING

Subject to local needs as shown by our consultation, and recognising the skills of other organisations in many other areas, we are looking at a range of initiatives such as: 

  • Affordable to rent/buy housing similar to other models on Mull and Gigha

  • Honey and associated products

  • Circular economy - how do be achieve balance in what we need locally and what can we produce ourselves

  • Wood chipped animal bedding - with straw at a premium and an abundance of Sitka forests nearing maturity, this would give a local solution to a local need